Parsi Resources

The Bawa love for food is directly unproportional to the size of our community. For a small ‘tribe’ as we are now officially called, we sure do make our presence felt in every part of the globe.

Below are a bunch of other resources in addition to the Bawi Bride that you can refer to expand your knowledge of all things Parsi both food and beyond!

Food, Culture and Heritage Websites:

Parsi Cuisine by Rita Kapadia: An exhaustive blog on all things Parsi. In addition to food, the blog includes some great resources for traditional parsi ceremonies, arts & crafts as well as shops and caterers.

Ahura Mazda by Sarosh & Shernaz Petigara: Living abroad and looking for some religious resources you can refer to for your family – look no further than this site. Their interactive daily prayer book is an invaluable resource for kids learning their navjote prayers while the exhaustive information on our fire temples, festivals, parsi names etc is a great read for all ages alike.

Cookbooks:

Jamva Chaloji by Katy Dalal: There is likely not a Parsi in town that doesn’t know about Katy Dalal. Her recipe books came to me as part of the marriage dowry and they are a must read for anyone wanting to learn more about the traditional Parsi dishes – while they are a bit fancy for everyday cooking, I highly recommend these books!

Parsi Food by Gulrukh Irani: This book is a great one as it introduces a new comer and an old hand at cooking to the different tastes of Indian Parsi food. What the Bawi Bride loves best about it is that it includes the everyday Parsi favourites rather than only focusing on the delicacies.

101 Parsi Recipes by Jeroo Mehta: Another must read this recipe books covers the hallmark Parsi dishes and has been a great source of reference for me over the years. 

Parsi Cuisine Manna of the 21st Century by Rita Kapadia: In addition to her blog this is one of Rita’s many cookbooks and provides classical and regional recipes as well as an introduction to Parsi and Persian Zarathushti heritage, history, and culture. The book’s full color photographs  intertwined with descriptions of ancient and modern Parsi  folktales and travel excerpts are what attracts me the most.

 

Disclaimer: While all the resources are a great read, I must disclose at this point that Shernaz & Sarosh Petigara are my parents and Gulrukh Irani is my aunt – this by no means takes away from the creative work they have developed and I stand by my recommendations